A Song A Day
The Republic Tigers - Merrymake It With Me
50 plays

The Republic Tigers - Merrymake It With Me…

Their new No Land’s Man EP reminds me how listenable I find this band to be.

                                               

Cameron McGill & What Army
30 plays

Cameron McGill & What Army - Houdini

lyrics

                                               

Cameron McGill & What Army - Counterfeit
40 plays

Cameron McGill & What Army - Counterfeit


Read a track by track review of
Cameron McGill & What Army’s Is A Beast album HERE

* lyrics

                                               

Lupe Fiasco - Fighters Feat. Matthew Santos (edit)
60 plays

Lupe Fiasco - Fighters  (Feat. Matthew Santos)

                                               

Flight Facilities - Crave You (Radio Edit) [feat. Giselle Rosselli]
149 plays

Flight Facilities - Crave You feat. Giselle Rosselli (Radio Edit)


This song came out over a year ago and there are many versions/remixes floating around now, but this one is still my favorite.

                                               

Shwayze - Buzzin' (Classixx Remix Edit)
59 plays

Shwayze - Buzzin’ (Classixx Remix)

                                               

Otis Redding - These Arms Of Mine
60 plays

Otis Redding - These Arms Of Mine…

The best things that happened at Stax happened by accident, and the discovery of their biggest talent was no different. Many legends surround the recording of “These Arms of Mine”, but every one jives on the fact that Otis wasn’t supposed to be recording anything that day.

One legend states that it was Joe Galkin who suggested salvaging the last half hour of a failed Johnny Jenkins session by recording Redding. Others seem to remember that Redding himself had become such a nuisance that they finally had to let him record something so everybody could just go home.

Most accounts skip right to the legendary recording of “These Arms of Mine”, but it’s clear that the first song Otis recorded that day was a mild bopper called “Hey Hey Baby”. Unimpressed by the singer and the song, Galkin had a mutiny on his hands when he implored everyone to try one more time, this time on a ballad that Redding had penned himself.

Booker T. Jones had already left the session, assuming they were through. Steve Cropper switched over to keys to play a few simple “church chords,” while Jenkins played guitar. Steinberg and Jackson held down the rhythm section.

“So he comes down and I say: ‘Play something, whatever you want to do. And he said ‘I don’t play piano, I play a little gut-tar. That’s what he said. So I played piano and he went: ‘These arms of mine…’ And hairs and goose bumps stood up on my arms.” - Steve Cropper, from Steve James’ “Guitarist Steve Cropper Still Haunted by Redding”

Despite a less-than-glowing debut, “These Arms of Mine” is one of the most important recordings the studio would ever make. Although Redding sounds very much like a lackluster Little Richard wannabe on “Hey Hey Baby”, “These Arms’” demonstrates Redding’s considerable talent as a writer of his own material, and the quavering vulnerability of the vocal recording is a Redding trademark the young man was to make famous in years to come. Whether anyone knew it then or not, that day at the studio was an important day indeed. That was the day that Otis Redding became the heart and soul of Stax.

Read more about the interesting history of this song HERE

                                               

Tigercity - Powerstripe
49 plays

Tigercity - Powerstripe

                                               

Lanu - Beautiful Trash feat. Megan Washington
139 plays

Lanu - Beautiful Trash feat. Megan Washington

                                               

Melanie Fiona - Give It To Me Right
60 plays

Melanie Fiona - Give It To Me Right

Sample Source: The Zombies - Time Of The Season

                                               

Radiohead - Supercollider
50 plays

Radiohead - Supercollider…

Radiohead made 2 new songs available for download yesterday and FREE for fans who purchased King of Limbs.

Email from Radiohead announcing songs to fans:

Thank you - Merci - Gracias - Grazie - Dankeschön - Obrigado - Gui lah hui te ha - Ashoge - Shukran - Tsikomo - M goi - Tak - Dank u - Vinaka - Aabhar - Köszönöm - Go raibh maith agaibh - Arigato - Tashakkur - Dziekuje - Gestena - Hvala - Tack - Tesekkür ederim - Spasibo - Dêkuji - Sas efharisto ……    

Right, that’s most of you covered, apologies to those we’ve missed out … ok, so here are two tracks for your listening pleasure:

Supercollider and The Butcher. We released these as a limited edition 2 track 12inch vinyl to mark Independent Record Store Day last Saturday, April 16 … so in case you missed out and didn’t get a copy here they are.

It’s a thank you for being SO supportive of what we do …

p.s. This is not part of a new loyalty points scheme, a Radiohead clubcard or even an air miles redeemable reward type thing…

It is just a big old-fashioned thank you!

Hope your Spring/Autumn is good.


Ed, Colin, Jonny, Philip & Thom

x

FYI… ‘The Butcher’ was recorded and mixed during ‘The King of Limbs’ sessions, but we couldn’t make it work on the album; ‘Supercollider’ was started during those sessions and finished off in March of this year.

                                               

Tigercity - Solitary Man
59 plays

Tigercity - Solitary Man

                                               

The National - Think You Can Wait Ft. Sharon Van Etten
70 plays

The National - Think You Can Wait feat. Sharon Van Etten

http://www.merchantsofrock.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/national-win-win.jpg

                                               

Nat King Cole
40 plays

Nat King Cole - L-O-V-E  (c. 1965)

The bouncy, upbeat tune “L-O-V-E” was the B-side of Nat King Cole's 1964 Top 40 single “I Don't Want to See Tomorrow” and even grazed the bottom of the singles chart itself.  When it showed signs of international popularity, it became the focus of a full-length Cole LP of the same name. This proved to be Cole's final LP project before his death from lung cancer in February 1965.  Barely a hint of his encroaching lung cancer can be heard here though, and what's more, L-O-V-E documents one of the most gorgeous and sustained duets of the era. The other starring voice here is that of trumpeter Bobby Bryant, who plays with, at, and around Cole’s vocals with a full spectrum of the instrument’s tonal capabilities.

                                               

Frank Sinatra - Bim Bam Baby
181 plays

Frank Sinatra - Bim Bam Baby  (c.1952)

buy the MP3 on Amazon.com